Hear me out: Grindr but for Food

It does not matter what you call it, every place has a different name for it, from a Marble Khalbatta to a modern name of Pharmacy Mortar Pestle, we all have seen it in use, at least once. The only thing that is common about it is the fact that it is a must in every single kitchen. I grew up calling it Okhli Musli, while some even call it dori danda. It was one of the most prized possessions of my grandmother. Similarly, my mother had a Marble Spice Grinder, too, and oddly enough my mother never used any other for any kind of kitchen work.

The Marble Spice Grinder is a very handy commodity in every day kitchen work. It is one of the old age kitchen appliances which are still in use, today. It is one of the oldest ever human made kitchen tools. Archaeologists discovered some mortar pestles dating back to 35000 BC. There are electrical grinders in the market, too, and people use them, as well. However, for some spices, the Marble Khalbatta is preferred over the grinder, at least, by all of the boomer generation housewives. Ideally, the wet and oily ingredients are grinded by the mortar and pestle, for example, guacamole, hummus, etc.

It is also used for various pharmaceutical purposes. Mostly used by the homeopathic school of medicine, the mortar and pestle are a fantastic tool for trituration of various ingredients which are used in medicines to treat a wide range of diseases. The smaller versions of these old age grinders are still in use, this is because of their belief in the traditional and natural way of treating medical conditions. This is not only ideal for their practice as it keeps their ancient touch intact but it is also really suitable because the natural ingredients are grinded in an effective manner.

It is important to for the mortar and pestle to be made of the finest stone. This is because the better the quality of the stone, the more durable it is. Like I mentioned before, my grandmother had her own Khalbatta made out of the finest marble there is. She got it as a wedding gift and it is still in my mother’s kitchen, today. It has lasted more than nine decades! The better the stone, the better it will function. This leads to a distinct taste in the things that prepared using the ingredients for which the Marble Khalbatta was used.

I, for one, am a huge fan of the ancient kitchen appliances which are still in use in modern kitchens. They instill a sense of nostalgia from childhood. My grandmother used to make a really spicy herbal sauce which was grinded in a mortar and pestle. So, whenever I see one of these Marble Khalbatta’s it just reminds me of the old days and I cannot help but feel that distinct taste in the back of my mouth.

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